A Brand Icon: Coke Bottle Still in Great Shape 100 Years Later!

A Brand Icon: Coke Bottle Still in Great Shape 100 Years Later!

Coke Cap IMG_7101-2

The building of a brand icon “When Andy Warhol wanted a shape to represent mass culture, he drew the [Coca Cola] bottle and when Volkswagen wanted to celebrate the shape of the Beatle, they compare…

Source: A Brand Icon: Coke Bottle Still in Great Shape 100 Years Later!

Whenever I give a presentation on marketing, one brand I reference frequently is Coca Cola.  In over 100 years of marketing, Coke is one of the most iconic worldwide brands. Today, Coca Cola has receded in sales inside the company but it’s recognized everywhere.  Few people on the planet don’t know what it is.

I tip my hat to them.  Coca Cola initiated many of the marketing communication methods still in use today.  Their distinctive bottle design, branded cups, machines and dispensers, logo’d merchandise beyond the product, giveaways, brand extensions (Diet Coke, Cherry Coke, Vanilla Coke), sponsorship, product placement and more, have become so commonplace it’s hard to remember when that kind of marketing didn’t exist.

coke_bottle_chronology

I also chuckle at myself because I paid them to visit the World of Coca Cola in Atlanta years ago.  I gave them money so they could market to me.  I even bought some logo glasses in the gift shop.

If you have one lesson to learn from Coke, besides being delicious, is that being true and clear about your vision can help sustain you for the life of your business and, possibly, beyond.

Is Your Business Ready for 2016?

Take an honest assessment of where your business is today. Get out a piece of paper (or an electronic doc) and make note of what you need to: Start doing Stop doing Continue doing based on last year’s results. What’s not working in your marketing activities? Where are you dropping the ball with customers? How can you improve your profit margin? This one step alone will make a huge difference in creating new strategies and action steps for the coming year.

Source: Is Your Business Ready for 2016?

If you’ve read the EMyth or follow any of their advice, you know how valuable and wise Michael Gerber’s former organization is.  I know I’m already looking ahead to 2016, making plans and charting my course.

In the linked article, there’s great advice about not just skipping the last 2 months of the year but using it to reflect and map out your business’ plans for the 2016 into 2018.

One of the many great pieces of advice:

Take an honest assessment of where your business is today. Get out a piece of paper (or an electronic doc) and make note of what you need to:

 

  • Start doing
  • Stop doing (emphasis added)
  • Continue doing based on last year’s results

What’s not working in your marketing activities? Where are you dropping the ball with customers? How can you improve your profit margin? This one step alone will make a huge difference in creating new strategies and action steps for the coming year.

If you’re feeling out of tune with your company’s direction or are overwhelmed with the details of running your business everyday, you owe it to yourself and to your customers to have a plan.  Planning always gets pushed aside for the urgent.  Planning isn’t urgent but it’s necessary.  I guess I’m in the same boat as all of you.  Time to book some library time for myself and plot a course for 2016.

Are You The Networker From Hell?

Networker From Hell

 

Have you ever attended a networking event where someone just went up and shoved a business card or flyer in your hand?

I had a guy at a chamber mixer start talking to me about freestanding saunas and telling me that I should have one, that it was only $6,000 to buy one and all the health benefits. I kept trying to get a word in and tell him that I hated saunas because I feel claustrophobic in them. How did he know that’s where I wanted to spend my money or if I had the room?  It was annoying and funny at the same time. He was just clueless.

Don’t be THAT guy!

The Achilles’ heel of networking is too many people expecting too much in a short amount of time. Marketing and relationship-building is an investment.  Networking in an investment.  People you meet are not ATMs.  They are people craving connection.  The first thing to deliver is openness, genuine curiosity and authenticity.

My friend, master networker, Kristy Rogers of Kristy Rogers Connects, teaches her clients how to be a pleasure to do business with.  Every step of interacting with other people should be a pleasure.  That’s not stiff, boring or clinical.  It’s authentic, warm, caring.  Isn’t that what we want in the human experience anyways?

Ivan Meisner, Founder of BNI (Business Networking International) , wrote recently in Entrepreneur magazine online:

Many people rely on referrals from others as a primary source of business. However, not everyone who relies on referrals is successful. Why is this? I’ve studied these folks — and those who are not successful seem to have “surface level” referral relationships.

They know just enough about their referral sources’ businesses to get by. They don’t actually know a lot about the people themselves. They tend to say vague things like: “He is really nice,” “You’ll like her; she’s a good person,” or “Well, if you just meet with him, I am sure you’ll like him.” If pressed further, they probably couldn’t tell you much more about those people — and they almost certainly have not built enough social capital with them to count on them when they really need something from the relationship (and vice versa).

Most people go to a networking event to “meet” people.  So many think “meet” means get sales, failing to realize that marketing is like dating.  If the guy wants to marry you on the first date, RUN!  He’s probably a stalker or remaking an episode of Criminal Minds. If  you don’t date like that, why do you market like that?

Before you become the Networker From Hell, consider this:

5 Do’s and Don’ts To Being A Pleasure to Network With
It’s time to have a little fun, support the group that’s running it, try out some wine, get some good food and meet people like you would at a social function…within limits like staying sober and not being obnoxious.

1) Go to network with an open heart
I had a business coach who would ask me after every event if who I met was a lead or not.  I DID NOT  like that.  How should I know?  I had met them for a few minutes, I had no idea.  BUT, I did know that would meet for coffee or a chat on the phone and figure out how we could help each other.  Maybe we couldn’t.  Maybe they were someone who could help me or I could refer them.  I just didn’t know until I talked with them more.  All I’ve ever wanted to do is meet great people. I’ve learned…Don’t judge a book by it’s cover and been surprised…a lot!

2) Be genuinely curious
Ever heard this before? Act like the host.  Most people don’t know what that means.  To me, you just ask good, open-ended questions and pepper in some conversation extenders like:

  • “What do you do?”
  • “Tell me more about that.”
  • “How did you get into your business?”
  • “What were you doing before your current job?”
  • “What’s the best part of your business?”
  • “Where else are you networking?”
  • “That sounds good.” “I never thought of it like that.”

You don’t have to be fake.  It’s just like meeting a new friend.

3) Don’t drink too much.  Stay away from hot-button issues?
Oh, regrets.  I’ve had a few.  Being tipsy at a business function has never served me well.  So, I won’t drink at networking functions anymore. But, staying away from hot-button issues?  I’ve had some great conversations when disagreeing with others.  I look for people who have a strong opinion.  It doesn’t faze me.   Do what fits your style and taste.  You may not like to be so outgoing.  That’s okay.  As long as it’s not insulting, I think having a different idea is good.  Either way, just don’t be afraid to be yourself.

4) Commit to get deeper
Someday you’ll have to ask Speaking Guru, Lynn Kirkham of Yes! You Can Speak, about our initial deep conversation.  The amount of people we had in common was astonishing!  We discovered we had a mutual good friend (to both of us) and we called her from my cell phone but Lynn was speaking.  Our friend was soooo confused…at first.  After that, Lynn and I quickly bonded.  It just took a while for us to get really deep.  The more we got to know each other, the more we strengthened our friendship and business relationship, to do business with each other.  Getting deep can create incredible referral sources for us and create wonderful friends.

5) Be in it for the long haul
Getting referrals, good ones, takes time.  Having great connections takes time.  Go to your networking knowing you want to meet quality people that see it like you do…long-term.  In the “marketing is like dating”, it may not be marriage but a steady long-lasting relationship is an beautiful outcome.
See.  You can save yourself from becoming the Networker From Hell and be a pleasure to network with.  Just need a little gumption and commitment!

7 Insider Timing Tips To Get Your Email Marketing Read

 

Crowdspring.com published a fascinating article called Small Business Marketing: Best Times And Days To Send Email For Opens And Click-Throughs about the timing of emails and inlcuding this fantastic info graphic on figuring out the timing of email delivery.

Here are 7 takeaways from the article:

1) Find an email delivery resource that let’s you deliver the email based on where the recipient is. For instance, it’s good to deliver an email at 9am but if you launch it at 9am EST then it’s 6am PST and those Hawaiians are snoozing away at 3am HST.

2) Sending an email too late in the day means that it gets stale because the vast majority are opened within an hour of being sent. The longer it sits, the less likely the reader opens it or even finds it.

3) The peak opening hours are between 9am and 4pm with the highest opening time around 3pm.

4) Thursday is the best date followed very closely by Wednesday.

5) HOWEVER, know who your target recipient is helps determine the best time and day of the week for you. The perfect example is that at 6am on any cable news station Monday thru Friday, you’ll see ads for accounting firms and other services you’ll never see at 3pm. The appeal is to early-rising executives. That’s good context for your email delivery time and date.

6) Make sure you have your email in recipient’s boxes at least 1 hour prior to peak open times.

7) And, then, there’s this.  Scott Stratten, author of UnMarketing posted this yesterday:

Breaking research: the best time to post to your blog is when you have something useful to say. Not “Tuesday”. Not “weekly”. When you have something that is worth the interruption to your readers day to say “You need to know this.” not “I’ve been told frequency is good!”. Respect their inbox. Respect their feeds.

It’s not specifically about email newsletters but I took to heart to mean you can better connect with readers when you send them something of value and meaning to you.

Below is my cool pictograph that I borrowed with the do’s and don’ts of email marketing.  Sums it up beautifully.